Publications

We regularly present new scientific publications on the subject of "tinnitus", selected by the experts of the Tinnituszentrum Charité. The following publications are available for download:

April 2019 – "Association Between Stress and Tinnitus-New Aspects":
This contribution focuses on the relationship between stress and tinnitus. While the causal and directional pathways between these constructs continue to remain unclear, this paper uses an allostasis-based framework to discuss associations between physiological stress responses, individuals' idiosyncratic experiences of the tinnitus percept, and psychological treatment approaches.
Online summary
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March 2019 – "New European Tinnitus Guidelines":
For this guideline, experts from different disciplines from across Europe - among them Prof Dr med Birigt Mazurek - have joined forces to develop standardisation procedures for easy, practicable, and meaningful patient profiling. The guideline should be used as a tool to support shared decision-making with patients to facilitate individualised care.
The main goal of this guideline is to establish uniformity in the assessment and treatment of adult patients with subjective tinnitus. In addition, this guideline aims to establish consistency in policy to optimise referral trajectories and reduce over- and under-assessment and treatment. Guidance for detailed clinical definition and characterisation of cases is also included.
Online summary
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March 2019 – "Psychological comorbidities in patients with chronic tinnitus": Tinnitus frequently occurs alongside psychological comorbidities whose assessment is important for treatment planning and -success. The selection of suitable questionnaires is thus crucial. The present study aims to investigate the ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR) to this regard.
Online publication
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March 2019 – "Basic research and clinical aspects — translational aspects of hearing research":
This publication contains many different articles about various topics that were discussed at the 55th Inner Ear Biology Workshop.
Online summary
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February 2019 – "Intermittent tinnitus - an empirical description":
Tinnitus is often divided into an acute and a chronic version. However, epidemiological studies have shown intermittent tinnitus (IT) to be the most common form and it does not clearly belong to any of these categories.
The aim of the study was to provide a more detailed description of IT.  
Online summary
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January 2019 – "Tinnitus: psychosomatic aspects":
Tinnitus is a  symptom of unclear etiology, which can be multifactorially caused and maintained. It is often, but not necessarily, associated with hearing loss. Emotional stress or maladaptive coping strategies that may develop in response to or be amplified by tinnitus are key factors for psychosocial intervention. The article deals with measures that have an impact on life and tinnitus situation.
Online summary
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August 2017 – "Tinnitus and Stress: An Interdisciplinary Companion for Healthcare Professionals":
This book "Tinnitus and stress" provides up-to-date scientific information on the pathways by which psychosocial stress can affect the auditory system and describes current approaches to the management of patients with stress-related tinnitus. The latest evidence is presented on aspects such as the role of stress hormones in auditory function, the effects of allostatic load, circadian sensitivity to auditory trauma, and the association between stress-related biomarkers and tinnitus. The clinically oriented chapters discuss psychometric instruments of value in the tinnitus clinic and present stress-related tinnitus treatment protocols and outcome measures. 

It is widely acknowledged that the tinnitus percept acts as a stressor. However, it is also now evident that psychosocial stress can play a causative role in tinnitus and that the impact varies according to the level, duration, and quality of the stress. Assessment of the types and levels of stress in tinnitus patients before, during, and after treatment is therefore very important. Healthcare professionals attending tinnitus patients will benefit from the information that this book provides on the relationship between tinnitus and stress and from the practical guidance that it offers.
Online summary

October 2015 – "Tinnitus: perspectives from human neuroimaging":
Tinnitus is the perception of phantom sound in the absence of a corresponding external source. It is a highly prevalent disorder, and most cases are caused by cochlear injury that leads to peripheral deafferentation, which results in adaptive changes in the CNS. In this article we critically assess the recent neuroimaging studies in individuals with tinnitus that suggest that the disorder is accompanied by functional and structural brain abnormalities in distributed auditory and non-auditory brain regions. Moreover, we consider how the identification of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the different forms of tinnitus would benefit from larger studies, replication and comprehensive clinical assessment of patients.
Online summary: Neuroimaging and tinnitus
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July 2015 – "Association between tinnitus severity and symptoms of depression and anxiety":
Clinical studies indicate increased risk for depression and anxiety among tinnitus patients. However population data are scarce, and no studies have controlled for neuroticism. The researchers examined associations between tinnitus and symptoms of depression and anxiety in a large UK population, controlling for neuroticism, to explore whether neuroticism, as previously reported, fully explains the association between symptoms of depression and anxiety, and tinnitus.
Online summary
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September 2015  – "Tinnitus: anxiety sensitivity and psychiatric comorbidities":
For the english journal Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, Ali Gül and four other researchers from Turkey have investigated the connection between anxiety sensitivity, i.e. the fear of anxiety, and chronic tinnitus. For this purpose, various tests were carried out with 50 tinnitus patients within six months. The same tests were then also carried out with 50 healthy people in order to finally be able to make a statistical comparison. The result: somatisation, depression and inner restlessness are significantly more frequent in the examined patients with chronic tinnitus. A confirmation for the Tinnitus and Hearing Foundation: Research into stress and tinnitus should definitely be continued.
Online summary
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December 2014 "Tinnitus prevalence in the city of São Paulo":
 The aim of the field research carried out by Jeanne Oiticica and Roseli Saraiva Moreira Bittar was to determine the prevalence of tinnitus in Sao Paulo, Brazil, about which no information was available until now. The Brazilian journal Otorhinolaryngology recently published the results of the study: a total of 1960 interviews revealed that 22% of those involved had tinnitus - more than the researchers had assumed. The interviews were conducted in over 600 households in the five main districts of the city, so that all age groups and socioeconomic profiles were equally involved.
Online summary
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November 2014 "Report on the state of well-being of patients with chronic tinnitus":
In the journal "Audiology & Neurotology", Professor Dr. Birgit Mazurek and Dr. Agnieszka J. Szczepek, as well as other tinnitus experts from the Charité, report on patients with chronic tinnitus who have already been treated with the tinnitus retraining therapy for three years. The results of the study show that the quality of life for patients has improved and that their level of suffering has decreased by using the therapy.
Online summary
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October 2014  Biological correlates of tinnitus-related distress:
Professor Dr. Birgit Mazurek and Dr. Agnieszka J. Szczepek, as well as other scientists from the University Medicine Berlin Mitte, publish the latest findings of the study on the biological detectability of tinnitus-related stress in issue 318 of the journal "Hearing Research". Read more about how measuring the concentration of selected cytokines (proteins that regulate the growth and differentiation of cells) could become an additional objective component of tinnitus diagnostics in the future.
Online summary
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